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Are all breast cancer diagnosis the same?

October 7, 2017

Well, I certainly thought so. My Mother had gone through it, so had her sister, my Aunt.

 

When I was diagnosed and the doctor told me I was TNBC, I was totally clueless at what he meant. You mean to tell me that there are more than one type of breast cancer? Indeed.

 

I will try here to explain all that i know of, but everyday more becomes knowns and now, not only are there different types, but sub-types as well.

 

When doing your monthly home examination, realize that a tumor can begin in different areas of the breast. hence the reason to fully check the breast itself but all around it as well.

  • DCIS — Ductal Carcinoma In Situ
    The earliest form of breast cancer. DCIS is when there are contained (in situ) cancer cells in the ducts of the breast and have not spread into normal breast tissue. DCIS may show on a mammogram and is usually diagnosed when women have a breast screening.

  • IDC — Invasive Ductal Carcinoma
    Most invasive breast cancers (80%) start in the ducts of the breast. IDC starts in the cells that line a milk duct in the breast, breaks through the wall of the duct, and grows into the nearby breast tissues. At this point, it may be able to spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body through the lymph system and bloodstream.

    • IDC Type: Tubular Carcinoma of the Breast

    • IDC Type: Medullary Carcinoma of the Breast

    • IDC Type: Mucinous Carcinoma of the Breast

    • IDC Type: Papillary Carcinoma of the Breast

    • IDC Type: Cribriform Carcinoma of the Breast

  • ILC — Invasive Lobular Carcinoma
    About 1 in 10 invasive breast cancers (10%) start in the lobes of the breast. This type can sometimes be difficult to diagnose on a mammogram because of the way it grows. Some women may need an MRI scan.

  • Inflammatory Breast Cancer
    Inflammatory breast cancer is an uncommon type of invasive breast cancer. It accounts for about 1% to 5% of all breast cancers.

  • LCIS — Lobular Carcinoma In Situ
    is NOT breast cancer. There are changes in the cells lining the lobes that showing an increased risk of developing breast cancer later in life. 

  • Male Breast Cancer
    Symptoms of breast cancer in men are similar to those in women. Most male breast cancers are diagnosed when a man discovers a lump on his chest. But unlike women, men tend to delay going to the doctor until they have more severe symptoms, like bleeding from the nipple. At that point the cancer may have already spread.

  • Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer
    There are five main intrinsic or molecular subtypes of breast cancer that are based on the genes a cancer expresses:

    • Luminal A breast cancer is hormone-receptor positive (estrogen-receptor and/or progesterone-receptor positive), HER2 negative, and has low levels of the protein Ki-67, which helps control how fast cancer cells grow.  Luminal A cancers are low-grade, tend to grow slowly and have the best prognosis.

    • Luminal B breast cancer is hormone-receptor positive (estrogen-receptor and/or progesterone-receptor positive), and either HER2 positive or HER2 negative with high levels of Ki-67. Luminal B cancers generally grow slightly faster than luminal A cancers and their prognosis is slightly worse.

    • Triple-negative/basal-like breast cancer is hormone-receptor negative (estrogen-receptor and progesterone-receptor negative) and HER2 negative. This type of cancer is more common in women with BRCA1 gene mutations. Researchers aren’t sure why, but this type of cancer also is more common among younger and African-American women.

    • HER2-enriched breast cancer is hormone-receptor negative (estrogen-receptor and progesterone-receptor negative) and HER2 positive. HER2-enriched cancers tend to grow faster than luminal cancers and can have a worse prognosis, but they are often successfully treated with targeted therapies aimed at the HER2 protein, such as Herceptin (chemical name: trastuzumab), Perjeta (chemical name: pertuzumab), Tykerb (chemical name: lapatinib), and Kadcyla (chemical name: T-DM1 or ado-trastuzumab emtansine).

    • Normal-like breast cancer is similar to luminal A disease: hormone-receptor positive (estrogen-receptor and/or progesterone-receptor positive), HER2 negative, and has low levels of the protein Ki-67, which helps control how fast cancer cells grow. Still, while normal-like breast cancer has a good prognosis, its prognosis is slightly worse than luminal A cancer’s prognosis.

  • Paget's Disease of the Nipple
    Paget’s disease is a condition that causes an eczema-like change to the skin of the nipple. Most women with Paget’s disease will also have breast cancer. The first sign of the condition is a rash on the nipple and the skin around it (areola). The area may be sore or crusty, and it may bleed or leak fluid.

  • Phyllodes Tumors of the Breast
    Phyllodes tumors are rare breast tumors. They develop in the connective tissue (stroma) of the breast, in contrast to carcinomas, which develop in the ducts or lobules. Most are benign, but there are others that are malignant (cancer).

  • Recurrent & Metastatic Breast Cancer

REFERENCES:

 

 

 

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Holistic Health Coach for Survivors and Thrivers